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Academy of Research In Occupational Therapy

AOREstablished in 1983, the AOTF Academy of Research in Occupational Therapy recognizes individuals who have made exemplary, distinguished, and sustained contributions toward the science of occupational therapy. Every year, the Academy of Research invites nominations for membership. After consideration of the nominations and supporting materials, the Academy selects individuals to be inducted into this distinguished body of researchers. Normally, inductions occur at the next AOTA Annual Conference and Exposition.  

View List of Academy of Research Members. * indicates a deceased member.

View Nomination Procedures

2021 Inductees to the Academy

Kathleen Doyle Lyons, ScD, OTR/L

2021

Kathleen Doyle Lyons, ScD, OTR/L

Kathleen Lyons, ScD, OTR/L, is a Senior Scientist at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center and Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College. Her research is focused on building the evidence base for occupational therapists working in oncology. She is trained in experimental design, mixed methods and implementation science. Her research program is designed to answer the following question: How can we support people living with cancer to fully participate in meaningful activities, life roles, and society through theory-driven and evidence-based rehabilitation? She designs and tests pragmatic interventions that blend occupational therapy with behavioral therapies. Her research is primarily community-based as she has developed both telehealth and home-based interventions.

Q&A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you: careful, practical, and resilient

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research? I have the heart of a practitioner, so my goal is to build our evidence base so that we can make good choices with our clients and provide the most potent therapy. The question that guides my applied research program is “How can we support people living with cancer to fully participate in meaningful activities and roles through theory-driven and evidence-based rehabilitation?”

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?  Be brave and be humble. It takes courage to do research that matters, to formulate a hypothesis and rigorously test it. And it takes humility to let the data and the participants teach and lead you. 

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?  I’m really interested in what makes an occupation therapeutic for a given person and what makes one occupation more therapeutic than another in any given moment. I think we need to understand how people naturally use occupation to foster recovery and healing outside of or in the absence of therapy.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey. I learned a lot from my mentors, but the best gift they gave me was showing me the joy they got from their work. I went on to doctoral work because I enjoyed every minute of my qualitative research thesis with Betty Crepeau. In my doctoral training, Linda Tickle-Degnen showed me her limitless passion for words, numbers, ideas and elegant research designs. And it was from Marty Bruce that I (finally) learned how pleasurable it can be to write a tight and compelling grant application. I feel lucky to have had mentors that showed me how much they love science.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work: My top three favorites are traveling, watching live theater, and hiking.

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research? Being part of team science is incredibly rewarding. I love writing and I could do that all day, but being in a room with people from all different disciplines and playing with ideas to solve clinical problems is highly rewarding. When I was just starting out, I don’t think I realized that science is a very social activity and that has been a happy surprise.

How have you been involved with AOTF to date? I received two grants from AOTF, one as a doctoral student and one more recently. But the biggest blessing was being asked to chair the Planning Grant Collective focused on cancer rehabilitation. It was an absolutely amazing experience to bring together scientists from different disciplines and parts of the country to brainstorm ways to advance research to reduce participation restrictions experienced by cancer survivors. It was a really energizing and productive event and I’m so grateful to AOTF for investing in the Planning Grant Collectives!

 

Shawn C. Roll, PhD, OTR/L, RMSKS, FAOTA, FAIUM

2021

Shawn C. Roll, PhD, OTR/L, RMSKS, FAOTA, FAIUM

Dr. Shawn C. Roll is an Associate Professor at the University of Southern California’s Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, where he also directs the PhD in Occupational Science program. Dr. Roll is a licensed occupational therapist, registered sonographer, and occupational scientist who studies the relationships between musculoskeletal conditions of the arms and hands, people’s ability to perform activities and their health outcomes within the workplace. His specialties include using ultrasound to study carpal tunnel syndrome, which affects an estimated 10 million Americans with annual health care costs of $2 billion, funded by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). He also studies holistic approaches for improving the experience and results of hand therapy. His largest current project, funded by the National Science Foundation, is designing the next generation of intelligent “smart desks” that can automatically learn from, adapt to, and respond to users’ habits and preferences to improve worker health and well-being.

Q&A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you: Attentive, Strategic, Tenacious

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research? I hope that my research will support long-term, positive changes in workplace environments, work design, and workers’ engagement in their daily activities resulting in workers who are healthier, happier, and able to flourish in their lives. I strive to support this vision by conducting research that illuminates how physical health and mental well-being are shaped by the intersections among the physical, social, and organizational environments with the individual characteristics of workers’ as they engage in daily occupations in the workplace.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research? Build, maintain, and foster relationships. You should identify what you are most passionate about, be persistent, and be resilient, but a scientist cannot conduct robust research in isolation. Instead, building relationships with other scientists and developing interdisciplinary collaborations will both open more opportunities and broaden the impact of the research.

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy? Measuring, understanding, and supporting meaningful engagement. While there has been much exploration of engagement and theories developed regarding the importance of how we engage in daily occupations there is limited direct, quantitative examination of engagement relative to the success of preventive, rehabilitative, and habilitative interventions.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey: Seeing my potential and creating opportunities to ensure I was able to thrive as a scholar. I wouldn’t be where I am today with the early vision and support of my career from Dr. Jane Case-Smith and the ongoing opportunities created by Dr. Kevin Evans. Each of my mentors were able to vision all of the potential paths that were ahead of me well before I saw them myself, and they engaged me in activities, introduced me to opportunities, and planted seeds of ideas that allowed me to become a successful scientist.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work: Spending quality time with friends and loved ones over a glass of wine, with good food, watching television or movies, at the theater, on a hike, or just sitting in shared silence with each other.

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research? Without a doubt the most rewarding aspect of my career is witnessing the “lightbulb moments” of my students and mentees. I aim to emulate my own mentors, by visioning the opportunities and paths ahead of my individual mentees, and then proving the necessary scaffolding and support to help them travel forward on their own best path. It gives me great joy to see the moments along the way when mentees reach new levels of thought and clarity regarding their ideas and own work that propels them forward on their path.

How have you been involved with AOTF to date? I have been a strong supporter of AOTF’s mission to advance knowledge that supports the work of our profession to ensure people’s successful participation in life. This support began as a student when I joined Pi Theta Epsilon as a lifetime member, and has continued throughout my career by providing financial support to AOTF, attending AOTF events, and submitting/reviewing manuscripts in OTJR, and serving as a mentor for the Summer Institute for Future Scientists.

Members of the Academy of Research

Christine Helfrich, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

2013

Christine Helfrich, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

Dr. Helfrich is an adjunct instructor at Bristol Community College, Fall River, Massachusetts and Co-Investigator Project Team, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. Dr. Helfrich describes her research in this way: "My research is community based with vulnerable populations including individuals who are/have been homeless, survivors of domestic violence and their children and individuals with mental illness. Working with these populations I have completed needs assessments, developed interventions and evaluated outcomes."  (Retrieved on June 4, 2015 from https://www.linkedin.com/pub/christine-helfrich/83/b19/1b7.)


Q and A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you.
Innovative. Collaborative. Generous.

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?
I would like my work to support occupational therapists to assist individuals, particularly those who are marginalized, to develop the skills they need and a sense of their own competence and worth so that they are free to be themselves and do what is important to them.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?
Don't be afraid to do what you believe is important, the most motivating words to me are "You won't be able to do it." Focus on an area that you are passionate about, so that when you encounter internal or external barriers, you will be motivated to keep going.

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
The field needs to continue to educate others about the importance of occupation and that involving human beings needs to be translational and community based even if the tradeoff means smaller sample sizes. We must educate federal funders about the importance of our role in all areas of rehabilitation.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey.
They believed in my ideas, encouraged my "non-traditional" applications of occupational therapy and supported my dreams and endeavors.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work.
Supporting my daughter to believe she can become whatever she wants and to be proud of who she is. Travelling and making every day an adventure!

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?
That my work has been more far reaching than I ever imagined and that it has helped a wide variety of people in a number of ways clinically and has supported the work of occupational therapists in various settings.


Selected References

Chan, DV, Helfrich, CA, Hursh, NC, Sally, Rogers E & Gopal S.  (2014). Measuring community integration using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and participatory mapping for people who were once homeless. Health and Place, 27, 92-101.

Chang, FH, Coster, WJ & Helfrich CA.  (2013). Community participation measures for people with disabilities: a systematic review of content from an international classification of functioning, disability and health perspective. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 94, 771-781.

Helfrich, CA, Simpson, EK &Chan, DV.  (2014). Change patterns of homeless individuals with mental illness: a multiple case study. Community Mental Health Journal, 50, 531-537.  

Margo Holm, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, ABDA

2001

Margo Holm, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, ABDA

Dr. Holm is Professor Emeritus, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Occupational Therapy Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  Her research interests are in functional outcomes of medical, psychiatric and rehabilitation interventions and evidence-based practice.  (Retrieved on May 27, 2015 from https://www.shrs.pitt.edu/mbholm/.) Dr. Holm was awarded the American Occupational Therapy Association's 1999 Eleanor Clarke Slagle Lectureship and their Award of Merit in 2014. She was also named one of the 100 Influential People in Occupational Therapy by AOTA.     

 

 

 

 

 

 

Q and A 

Identify three words that others have used to describe you. 

Mentor. Advocate. Principled.

 

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research? 

The ability to carry out meaningful everyday activities is closely related to one's quality of life, regardless of country or culture.  How "ability to carry out" is measured can subsequently determine which interventions are appropriate and acceptable to clients. Methods and outcomes of measurement has been a thrust at Pitt, and our research has changed policies, protocols, and patient outcomes.

 

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research? 

Unless you like delayed gratification, this is the wrong career for you!

 

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy? 

Systematic collection of occupational therapy assessment data, intervention mechanisms, and client outcomes to evaluate and document the effectiveness of occupational therapy.

 

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey. 

My primary mentor, Dr. Joan C. Rogers, led by example. "People may doubt what you say, but they will always believe what you do" could easily be her motto.  For me, that was a powerful learning strategy.

 

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work. 

Travel.  I enjoy immersing myself in other cultures and learning which daily activities are important, as well as the habits and routines that surround them.

 

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?  

Most surprising.....after years of recruiting human subjects only to lose them to long-term follow-up, I am developing an affinity for rat studies.

 

References

Holm, MB.  (2000). The 2000 Eleanor Clarke Slagle Lecture. Our mandate for the new millennium: evidence-based practice.  The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 54, 575-585.

 

Ciro, CA, Anderson, MP, Hershey, LA, Prodan, CI & Holm MB.  (2015). Instrumental activities of daily living performance and role satisfaction in people with and without mild cognitive impairment: a pilot project. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(3):6903270020p1-6903270020p10.

 

Holm, MB, Baird, JM, Kim, YJ, Rajora, KB, D'Silva, D, Podolinsky, L, Mazefsky, C & Minshew, N.  (2014). Therapeutic horseback riding outcomes of parent-identified goals for children with autism spectrum disorder: an ABA' multiple case design examining dosing and generalization to the home and community. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 44, 937-947. 

 

Sabedra, AR, Kristan, J, Raina, K, Holm, MB, Callaway, CW, Guyette, FX, Dezfulian, C,

Doshi, AA & Rittenberger, JC.  (2015). Post cardiac arrest service. Neurocognitive outcomes following successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest.  Resuscitation. 90, 67-72. 

 

Naomi Josman, PhD, OT(I)

2015

Naomi Josman, PhD, OT(I)

Dr. Josman is Professor, academic head of the occupational therapy program in Mivchar and head of the PhD doctoral program in occupational therapy, the Faculty of Social Welfare & Health Sciences, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel. Professor Josman's research focuses on areas of executive function, cognitive rehabilitation, specifically cognition, metacognition and its influence on occupation, and use of virtual reality in rehabilitation.  Research projects have been conducted with various populationsincluding children with developmental and/or learning disabilities, adults with neurological dysfunction, individuals with schizophrenia and the elderly. The scope of her cognitive studies extends into evaluation and assessment tools and strategies. (Retrieved on February 27, 2015 from http://hw2.haifa.ac.il/index.php/he/occupa-practical-training/occupa-training-bb-2/116-occupational-therapy/occupa-staff/academicstaffripui/250-naomijosmancv.)

 

Q AND A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you.  
Optimistic, mindful of others, indefatigable.

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?
Engaging collaboration among basic and applied researchers as well as clinicians, towards understanding and facilitating human performance.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?
Believe in what you want to do, set clear goals, and persist with hard work.

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
Strengthening our link to brain science research and keeping abreast of important findings for practice.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey.
Modeling their behaviors and values of curiosity, open mindedness, determination, precision, integrity and sharing of knowledge.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work.
Gardening.

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?
Realizing that your starting point always takes you on a path you never expected to explore; developing and managing a comprehensive academic structure for studying OT; deriving pleasure from educating and nurturing one's students and witnessing their success.


REFERENCES

Almomani, F, Josman, N, Al-Momani, MO, Malkawi, SH, Nazzal, M, Almahdawi, KA & Almomani, F.  (2014), Factors related to cognitive function among elementary school children. Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 21, 191-198.  

Gilboa, Y, Josman, N, Fattal-Valevski, A, Toledano-Alhadef, H & Rosenblum, S.  (2014). Underlying mechanisms of writing difficulties among children with neurofibromatosis type 1. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 35, 1310-1316.  

Josman, N, Kizony, R, Hof, E, Goldenberg, K, Weiss, PL & Klinger E.  (2014). Using the virtual action planning-supermarket for evaluating executive functions in people with stroke. Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases, 23, 879-887.  

Kizony, R, Demayo-Dayan, T, Sinoff, G & Josman N. Validation of the Executive Function Route-Finding Task (EFRT) in people with mild cognitive impairment. OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health, 31, S47-52. 

Noomi Katz, PhD, OTR

1995

Noomi Katz, PhD, OTR

Dr. Katz is Director of the Research Institute for Health and Medical Professions and Professor Emeritus, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel.  She was the founder of the Israel Journal of Occupational Therapy and editor from 1991-1997.  (Retrieved on May 27, 2015 from http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=iw&u=http://www.ono.ac.il/academics/ono-faculty-members/faculty-of-health-professions/full-time-faculty-members/prof-noomi-katz/%3Flang%3Den&prev=search.)
 
Dr. Katz's research interests are in the areas of cognition and occupation, relationships to health and quality of life.  Cognitive rehabilitation, evaluation and intervention of individuals with neurological deficits and disabilities.  Metacognition, awareness to abilities/disabilities and executive functions/dysfunctions implications for daily activities.  Neuronal and behavioral recovery after right hemisphere stroke with unilateral spatial neglect (USN).  Effectiveness of treatment methods, Cross-cultural cognitive performance, comparisons of different cultural groups, implications for learning and daily performance."  (Retrieved on June 9, 2015 from http://www.huji.ac.il/dataj/controller/ihoker/MOP-STAFF_LINK?sno=8205746&Save_t=.)

In 1997, Dr. Katz was the recipient of the first Award of Excellence Lectureship from the Israeli Society of Occupational Therapy.  


REFERENCES

Jacoby, M, Averbuch, S, Sacher, Y, Katz, N, Weiss, PL & Kizony, R.  (2013). Effectiveness of executive functions training within a virtual supermarket for adults with traumatic brain injury: a pilot study. IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, 21, 182-190.

Katz, N, Dejak, I & Gal, E.  (2015 Mar 3). Work performance evaluation and QoL of adults with high functioning autism spectrum disorders (HFASD). Work, [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 25735411.

Waldman-Levi, A, Bundy, A, & Katz, N. (2015). Playfulness and interaction: An exploratory study of past and current exposure to domestic violence. OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health, 35, 89-84.

Gary Kielhofner*, DrPH, OTR, FAOTA

1984

Gary Kielhofner*, DrPH, OTR, FAOTA

At the time of his death in 2010, Dr. Kielhofner was Professor and Wade-Meyer Chair,  Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Applied Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago.  Dr. Kielhofner is, of course, almost synonymous with his theoretical model -- the Model of Human Occupation (MOHO). In their tribute to Dr. Kielhofner, Drs. Braveman, Fisher, Suarez-Balcazar wrote the following (Braveman, Fisher, Suarez-Balcazar, 2010. p. 829):

In 1980, Gary and Janice Burke introduced a theoretical model under the mentorship of Mary Reilly to fill a gap in understanding and addressing clients with disabilities' psychosocial challenges in the rehabilitation process (Kielhofner & Burke, 1980). This groundbreaking theory, the Model of Human Occupation (MOHO), is currently the most widely used theory in occupational therapy research and practice. This model presented practitioners with a conceptual framework and practical tools to guide their assessment and reasoning process, effect change, and measure the impact of their intervention. It guides occupational therapy practitioners to consider the personal values and interests, roles and responsibilities, and environmental contexts of each client. The model also provided a foundation for program development and research initiatives. Gary's book, Model of Human Occupation: Theory and Application, now in its fourth edition, has served to educate generations of occupational therapy students (Kielhofner, 2008). More than 500 articles, books, and chapters have reported research, case studies, intervention approaches, and programs based on MOHO.

In 2011, Dr. Kielhofner, received the American Occupational Therapy Association's Award of Merit (posthumously). AOTA created the The Gary Kielhofner Emerging Leader Award and awarded it for the first time in 2014 to Rachel Dargatz. AOTF created The Gary W. Kielhofner Graduate Fellowship in Occupational Therapy to also further his impact. Dr. Kielhofner was named one of the 100 Influential People in Occupational Therapy by AOTA.


REFERENCES


Braveman, B., Fisher, G., & Suarez-Balcazar, Y. (2010). IN MEMORIAM-- "Achieving the ordinary things": a tribute to Gary Kielhofner. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 64, 828-831.  

Kielhofner, G.  (2008). Model of Human Occupation: Theory and application.  (4th Ed.)  Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Kielhofner, G. (1980). A Model of Human Occupation, Part 2. Ontogenesis from the perspective of temporal adaptation. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 34, 657-663.

Kielhofner, G. (1980). A Model of Human Occupation, Part 3, Benign and vicious cycles. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 34, 731-737.  

Kielhofner, G & Burke, JP. (1980). A Model of Human Occupation, Part 1. Conceptual framework and content. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 34, (9), 572-581.  

Kielhofner, G, Burke, JP & Igi, CH. (1980). A Model of Human Occupation, Part 4. Assessment and intervention. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 34, 777-788.  

Lee, SW, Kielhofner, G, Morley, M, Heasman, D, Garnham, M, Willis, S & Taylor, RR. (2012). Impact of using the Model of Human Occupation: a survey of occupational therapy mental health practitioners' perceptions. Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 19, (5), 450-456.  

Lee, SW, Morley, M, Taylor, RR, Kielhofner, G, Garnham, M, Heasman, D & Forsyth, K. (2011). The development of care pathways and packages in mental health based on the Model of Human Occupation Screening Tool. The British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 74, (6), 284-294.

Taylor, R. R., O'Brien, J., Kielhofner, G., Lee, S. W., Katz, B., & Mears, C. (2010). The occupational and quality of life consequences of chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis in young people. The British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 73, 524-530. 

Natasha A. Lannin, PhD, BSc(OT), GradDip

2017

Natasha A. Lannin, PhD, BSc(OT), GradDip

Dr. Lannin holds a joint research-only position with Alfred Health (Melbourne) and La Trobe University, and is an honorary Research Fellow at the John Walsh Institute for Rehabilitation Research at The University of Sydney, the George Institute for Global Health and the Florey Institute of Neurosciences and Mental Health. Working within the Alfred Health hospital network, she conducts clinical trials investigating the effectiveness of occupational therapy interventions as well as translation research into improving the long-term outcomes for those living with an acquired brain injury from stroke or traumatic causes. Dr. Lannin is a supervisor of higher research degree students (PhD and Master's). She has published widely in leading journals such as Stroke, Journal of Epidemiology, and Clinical Rehabilitation, and has received competitive research grants from federal government (including NHMRC), state government (including the Transport Accident Commission) and philanthropic organizations (including the National Stroke Foundation).

Read more about Dr. Lannin on her webpage.

 

Q AND A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you.

Dedicated, honest, passionate.

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?
At the heart of my research is the goal to increase the efficacy of what occupational therapists do every day with inpatients in rehabilitation, a belief that every patient deserves to receive the most effective services and treatment; the right treatment at the right time. So, I hope to make a difference by defining best practice, by conducting systematic reviews and running clinical trials; as well as conducting mixed methods and epidemiological studies designed to provide greater understanding of the issues as well as the prevalence of the problems, their impact on being able to perform everyday activities and how to best support independence and quality of life after neurological damage. And, most importantly, from seeing these findings translated across into the clinical rehabilitation of adults after brain injury and stroke.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?
Focus on one area and think carefully about the big issues in that area. You will need to keep coming back to these issues, and try not to sidetracked. Really good ideas translate to good research if they are grounded in real clinical issues, and as a researcher you can make instrumental changes to clinical practice if you remain focused on the issues that you are most passionate about.

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
Determining the cost-effectiveness of occupational therapy- we have the beginnings of this information in some areas of practice, but our cost-effectiveness is not yet universally known.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey.
The role of advocate. My mentors have not only provided advice and support to me directly, they have advocated for me to others which has led to some amazing opportunities for me. In many ways, they have been just as dedicated to my success, as they have their own.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work:
Parenting.

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?
The most rewarding has been the opportunity to co-design programs and research with consumers, this is what keeps me going. The thought that the work we do is really, really important to the people who I work with.

 

SELECTED REFERENCES

Lannin, N., Carr, B., Allaous, J., Mackenzie, B., Falcon, A., & Tate, R (2014). A randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of handheld computers for improving everyday memory functioning in patients with memory impairments after acquired brain injury. Clinical Rehabilitation, 28(5), 470–481.

Lannin, N. A., Cusick, A., McCluskey, A., & Herbert, R. D (2007).  Effects of Splinting on Wrist Contracture after Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial.  Stroke. 38, 111-116.  

Laver, K., Lannin, N. A.,  Bragge, P.,  Hunter, P.,  Holland, A., E., Tavender, E.,  O’Connor, D.,  Khan, F., Teasell, R.,  & Gruen Laver, R  et al (2014). Organising health care services for people with an acquired brain injury: an overview of systematic reviews and randomised controlled trials.  BMC Health Services Research, 14, 397.   

Gonçalves-Bradley, D.C., Lannin, N.A., Clemson, L.M., Cameron, I.D., & Shepperd, S (2016).  Discharge planning from hospital. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 1. Art. No.: CD000313. 

Mary Law, PhD, OT(C)

1998

Mary Law, PhD, OT(C)

Dr. Law is Professor in the School of Rehabilitation Science and also associate member of the Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. She holds the John and Margaret Lillie Chair in Childhood Disability Research. Dr. Law, an occupational therapist by training, is co-founder of CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research, a multidisciplinary research center at McMaster University.

Dr. Law's research centers on the development and validation of client-centered outcome measures, evaluation of occupational therapy interventions with children, the effect of environmental factors on the participation of children with disabilities in day to day activities, and transfer of research knowledge into practice. Dr. Law is the lead author of the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure, a client-centered outcome measure for occupational therapy, and has written books on Client-centered Occupational Therapy, Evidence-based Rehabilitation and Measurement of Occupational Performance. Dr. Law has been chair of the USA NIH Rehabilitation Research Committee and co-editor of Physical and Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics. Honors received nationally and internationally include the Muriel Driver Lectureship, the top award in Canadian Occupational Therapy; the Whittaker Award for pediatric rehabilitation research; Queen's University Legacy of Achievement Alumni Award, and Fellow, Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists. Retrieved on June 2, 2015 from http://www.pearsonclinical.com/authmaors/law-rhy.tml.   


REFERENCES

Law, M. (1991). 1991 Muriel Driver Lecture: The environment: a focus for occupational therapy. The Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 58, (4), 171-180.

Law, M, Anaby, D, Imms, C, Teplicky, R & Turner L. (2015). Improving the participation of youth with physical disabilities in community activities: An interrupted time series design. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 62, 105-115.  

Law, M & Darrah, J.  (2014). Emerging therapy approaches: an emphasis on function. Journal of Child Neurology, 29, 1101-1107.

Moll, SE, Gewurtz, RE, Krupa, TM, Law, MC, Larivière, N & Levasseur, M.  (2015). "Do-Live-Well": a Canadian framework for promoting occupation, health, and well-being. Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 82, 9-23.

Mary C. Lawlor, ScD, OTR/L

2004

Mary C. Lawlor, ScD, OTR/L

Dr. Lawlor is Associate Chair of Research and Professor, Mrs. T.H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California (USC), Los Angeles, California and has a joint appointment with the Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Pediatrics.  Dr. Lawlor's interests are in examining the meanings of illness and disability in family life, the social nature of therapeutic experience, and cultural influences on health care and developmental processes.  (Retrieved on June 9, 2015 from http://chan.usc.edu/faculty/directory/Mary_Lawlor.)    


REFERENCES

 

Jacobs, L, Lawlor, M & Mattingly, C.  (2011). I/We narratives among African American families raising children with special needs. Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry, 35(1):3-25.
 
Lawlor, MC. (2010). Autism and Anthropology? Ethos, 38, 167-171.
 
Solomon, O & Lawlor MC.  (2013). "And I look down and he is gone": narrating autism, elopement and wandering in Los Angeles. Social Science and Medicine, 94:106-114. \

Keh-chung Lin, ScD, OTR/L

2017

Keh-chung Lin, ScD, OTR/L

Dr. Lin is professor of occupational therapy at National Taiwan University and currently serves as Director of the General Affairs division of the College of Medicine at the University. Dr. Lin and his collaborators study whether, and to what extent, new rehabilitation interventions, such as robotic therapy, restore purposeful movement and the ability to do daily activities in patients who have suffered a stroke. To understand how improvement happens, Dr. Lin studies the changes that occur in the brain while the person is engaged in those interventions or how the brain has changed as a result of those interventions. Then, to ensure that the patient and others can have confidence in the progress reported to them, Dr. Lin studies the reliability and responsiveness of tests that are used to measure improvement in voluntary movement and basic and extended activities of daily living in persons who have had a stroke.

 

 

SELECTED RESOURCES

 

Wu, C. Y., Chuang, I. C., Ma, H. I., Lin, K. C., & Chen, L (2016). Validity and responsiveness of the Revised Nottingham Sensation Assessment for outcome evaluation in stroke rehabilitation. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 70, (2), 1-8.  

Fan, Y.T., Wu, C.Y., Liu, H.L., Lin, K.C., Wai, Y.Y., & Chen, Y.L (2015).  Neuroplastic changes in resting-state functional connectivity after stroke rehabilitation.  Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 9, Article 546.  

Chen, H.L., Lin, K.C., Liing, R.J., Wu, C.Y., & Chen. C.L et al. (2015). Kinematic measures of Arm-trunk movements during unilateral and bilateral reaching predict clinically important change in perceived arm use in daily activities after intensive stroke rehabilitation. Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, 12, 84.  

Lin, K.C., Huang, P.C., Chen, Y.T., Wu, C.Y., & Huang, W.L (2014). Combining Afferent Stimulation and Mirror Therapy for Rehabilitating Motor Function, Motor Control, Ambulation, and Daily Functions after Stroke.   Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 28(2), 153– 162.

Hsieh, Y.W., Wu, C.Y., Lin, K.C., Yao, G., Wu, & Chang, Y.J (2012). Dose–Response Relationship of Robot-Assisted Stroke Motor Rehabilitation the Impact of Initial Motor Status. Stroke, 43 (10), 2729-2734.

 

Kathleen Doyle Lyons, ScD, OTR/L

2021

Kathleen Doyle Lyons, ScD, OTR/L

Kathleen Lyons, ScD, OTR/L, is a Senior Scientist at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center and Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College. Her research is focused on building the evidence base for occupational therapists working in oncology. She is trained in experimental design, mixed methods and implementation science. Her research program is designed to answer the following question: How can we support people living with cancer to fully participate in meaningful activities, life roles, and society through theory-driven and evidence-based rehabilitation? She designs and tests pragmatic interventions that blend occupational therapy with behavioral therapies. Her research is primarily community-based as she has developed both telehealth and home-based interventions.

Q&A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you: careful, practical, and resilient

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research? I have the heart of a practitioner, so my goal is to build our evidence base so that we can make good choices with our clients and provide the most potent therapy. The question that guides my applied research program is “How can we support people living with cancer to fully participate in meaningful activities and roles through theory-driven and evidence-based rehabilitation?”

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?  Be brave and be humble. It takes courage to do research that matters, to formulate a hypothesis and rigorously test it. And it takes humility to let the data and the participants teach and lead you. 

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?  I’m really interested in what makes an occupation therapeutic for a given person and what makes one occupation more therapeutic than another in any given moment. I think we need to understand how people naturally use occupation to foster recovery and healing outside of or in the absence of therapy.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey. I learned a lot from my mentors, but the best gift they gave me was showing me the joy they got from their work. I went on to doctoral work because I enjoyed every minute of my qualitative research thesis with Betty Crepeau. In my doctoral training, Linda Tickle-Degnen showed me her limitless passion for words, numbers, ideas and elegant research designs. And it was from Marty Bruce that I (finally) learned how pleasurable it can be to write a tight and compelling grant application. I feel lucky to have had mentors that showed me how much they love science.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work: My top three favorites are traveling, watching live theater, and hiking.

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research? Being part of team science is incredibly rewarding. I love writing and I could do that all day, but being in a room with people from all different disciplines and playing with ideas to solve clinical problems is highly rewarding. When I was just starting out, I don’t think I realized that science is a very social activity and that has been a happy surprise.

How have you been involved with AOTF to date? I received two grants from AOTF, one as a doctoral student and one more recently. But the biggest blessing was being asked to chair the Planning Grant Collective focused on cancer rehabilitation. It was an absolutely amazing experience to bring together scientists from different disciplines and parts of the country to brainstorm ways to advance research to reduce participation restrictions experienced by cancer survivors. It was a really energizing and productive event and I’m so grateful to AOTF for investing in the Planning Grant Collectives!

 

Catherine Lysack, PhD, OT(C)

2007

Catherine Lysack, PhD, OT(C)

Dr. Lysack is the Deputy Director of the Institute of Gerontology (IOG) and a Professor in the Department of Health Care Sciences (Occupational Therapy) at the Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan.  

Dr. Lysack's research focuses on the social, physical and environmental influences on health, and understanding how older adults and people with disability redevelop active and meaningful lives in the community after illness and injury. She has conducted numerous studies including recent studies to evaluate methods to strengthen occupational therapy practice skills in mental health, and identify factors that facilitate community participation after spinal cord injury. She is presently conducted research on two projects: 1) Household Downsizing in Late Life, funded by the National Institute on Aging, and 2) Social Reintegration of Service-members and Veterans with Spinal Cord Injury Returning from Afghanistan and Iraq, funded by the U.S. Department of Defense. (Retrieved on June 9, 2015 from http://www.cphs.wayne.edu/research/occupational_research.php.)

 

Q AND A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you.
Curious. Tenacious. Diplomatic.

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?
I hope my work assists future therapists to be bold and creative in their work -- to examine functional problems in new ways so their patients can more easily achieve their goals.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?
Work on your writing skills now.  Scientists and researchers devote a great deal of time and effort to grant writing and publication of research findings.  Excellent writing skills are absolutely essential.

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
Science in general and science in the field of OS and OT should devote more resources to studying the root causes and effective treatments for mental health conditions, particularly depression.  Depression alone may be the single greatest cause of disability and lost productivity there is.  We should work harder on these large human problems.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey.
Mentors make you believe you can do it, when you are less sure. Mentors open doors to understanding and insight and they inspire.  You will not go far, or anywhere worthwhile without mentors.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work.
Playing competitive squash and working outside planting green things!

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?
It is a pleasure seeing my work make a difference in practice.  Nothing is more satisfying than seeing a student or a clinician use my research findings to make life better for someone else.  That is the greatest reward.


REFERENCES

Arthanat, S, Vroman, KG & Lysack C.  (2014). A home-based individualized information communication technology training program for older adults: a demonstration of effectiveness and value. Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 16, 1-9.  http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/17483107.2014.974219

Ficker, LJ, Lysack, CL, Hanna, M & Lichtenberg PA. (2014). Perceived Cognitive Impairment among African American elders: health and functional impairments in daily life.  Aging and Mental Health, 18, 471-480.

Luborsky, MR, Lysack, CL & Van Nuil, J. (2011). Refashioning One's Place in Time: Stories of Household Downsizing in Later Life.  Journal of Aging Studies, 25, 243-252.

Hui-Ing Ma, ScD, OT

2019

Hui-Ing Ma, ScD, OT

Since Dr. Hui-ing Ma completed her graduate education at Boston University in 2000, she has been teaching at the National Cheng Kung University in Taiwan, rising to the level of full professor. In addition to teaching and college, governmental and professional service, Dr. Ma conducts well respected, well-funded research on the motor control problems and quality of life of, and the effects of stigma on, persons with Parkinson’s disease and the effectiveness of occupational therapy interventions to improve those patients’ participation in their daily lives. She is one of the very few occupational therapists considered expert in the rehabilitation of persons with Parkinson’s disease. Additionally her research includes the verbal and cultural translation and establishment of the psychometrics for important English assessments for valid use with Chinese patients (pediatric participation; quality of life for patients with schizophrenia; PDQ-39, a questionnaire for persons with Parkinson’s disease).

 

Q and A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you.
Diligent, Fair, Empathetic

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?
I hope I have and will continue to make a difference by providing practical research findings that provide meaningful solutions to enhance the function and quality of life for clients. I also hope to make a difference by educating the next generation of occupational therapists, encouraging them to be good practitioners, teachers and researchers.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?
I would like to remind them of the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration. When working with scientists of different backgrounds, they will have to know their own professional knowledge well and be confident in this. At the same time they will have to be receptive to their collaborators’ ideas – this means enlightening the others with their work while at the same time learning from them. Each scientific discipline has their own unique perspective; sharing perspectives across disciplines can produce great unforeseen developments. 

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
OT needs diverse research to enrich the profession. I believe “service design” is a potential direction to broaden OT pursuits, raising our work from the individual to a public and even policy level. We, as OTs, have been familiar with universal design and environmental modification, which are mainly focused on tools and the physical environment. Service design, on the other hand, addresses “intangible” aspects. I think it is important to see the non-physical aspects of constraints and limitations, and incorporate systematic approaches of service design to enhance the experiences of clients and related stakeholders.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey. 
My role models expressed and encouraged me to emulate the qualities of fairness, humility, critical thinking, and the pleasure of pursuing and acquiring knowledge. They have shaped not only the research I am doing, but also who I am today.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work.
I like cooking for families. I enjoy preparing nutritious and delicious meals, trying new recipes, and having the people I serve experience the joy of good food.

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?
It is rewarding to see my research ideas being applied in real situations that help clients better cope with their life challenges. Furthermore, I feel surprisingly honored to get to know someone who has read and is interested in my work. Likewise, I enjoy reading other researchers’ ideas in the literature, expanding my own knowledge and inspiring new research pursuits for me. All these gifts in my career have been a blessing.

Selected References

Ma, HI, Saint-Hilaire, M, Thomas, CA, Tickle-Degnen, L. (2016) Stigma as a key determinant of health-related quality of life in Parkinson’s disease. Quality of Life Research 25, 3037–3045. doi: 10.1007/s11136-016-1329-z.

Su, KJ, Hwang, WJ, Wud, CY, Fang, JJ. (2014) Increasing speed to improve arm movement and standing postural control in Parkinson’s disease patients when catching virtual moving
Balls. Gait & Posture 39, 65–69.

Ma, HI, Hwang, WJ, Want, CY, Fang, JJ, Leong, IF, Want, TY. Trunk–arm coordination in reaching for moving targets in people with Parkinson’s disease: Comparison between
virtual and physical reality. (2012) Human Movement Science 31, 1340–1352.

Annette Majnemer, BSc(OT), MSc, PhD

2012

Annette Majnemer, BSc(OT), MSc, PhD

Dr. Majnemer is Professor, Director and Associate Dean, School of Physical & Occupational Therapy and an Associate Member of the Departments of Pediatrics and Neurology & Neurosurgery at McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada.  Her research interests focus on the developmental, functional and quality of life outcomes of children with disabilities and their determinants. Populations of interest include preterm infants, children with congenital heart defects following open-heart surgery, children with cerebral palsy and developmental delay. She is also examining health service utilization patterns and quality of care in these populations.  (Retrieved on July 1, 20015 from https://www.mcgill.ca/spot/faculty/majnemer)    


Q AND A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you.
Creative; supportive; optimistic.

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?
Making a difference in the lives of children with disabilities and their families; by contributing new knowledge that is used to enhance their functioning, participation and well-being. I hope that I also inspire others to pursue academic research careers and be successful in making a difference in their own ways.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?
Follow your personal passions and interests; your work as an academic should excite you and stimulate you every day. Also, take advantage of the opportunity to work with colleagues within and across disciplines; this will greatly enrich your perspectives and potential for impact.

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
There are many gaps between our scientific discoveries and the use of this new knowledge by front-line occupational therapists and by consumers and decision-makers within the health care system. Occupational therapy researchers are well positioned to advance the field of knowledge translation and implementation science, so as to ensure that practices and policies are evidence-based and in line with best practices.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey.  
Recognizing the importance and value of mentorship at all levels of your career trajectory; seeking out mentors to serve as role models that can guide you, and in turn, mentoring others that can benefit from your experiences and successes.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work.
I am fortunate to travel extensively, both as part of my academic work and also with my husband as part of leisure activities. These opportunities allow me to disconnect from the day to day occupations, enabling me to reflect on work and on life. These varied experiences continue to enrich my views and also energize and inspire me.

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?
The dedication and successes of my colleagues at the School of Physical & Occupational Therapy at McGill University is truly inspiring. I take tremendous pride in all that we have achieved together as a faculty, and I am honored to be their Director. My personal career achievements have been greatly facilitated by the incredible support of my husband and two daughters.


REFERENCES

Cavello, S, Majnemer, A, Duffy, CM & Ehrmann Feldman, D.  (2015). Participation in leisure activities by children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.  Journal of Rheumatology, 2015 Jun 15. pii: jrheum.140844. [Epub ahead of print]

Majnemer, A, Shikako-Thomas, K, Lach, L, Shevell, M, Law, M & Schmitz, N.The QUALAGroup.  (2013). Mastery motivation in adolescents with cerebral palsy. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 34, 384-392.

Solaski, M, Majnemer, A & Oskoui, M. (2014).  Contribution of socio-economic status on the prevalence of cerebral palsy: a systematic search and review. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 56, 1043-1051.

William Charles Mann, PhD, OTR, FAOTA

1994

William Charles Mann, PhD, OTR, FAOTA

Dr. Mann is Distinguished Professor and Chair of Occupational Therapy, Director of the PhD Program in Rehabilitation Science at the University of Florida (UF), Gainesville, Florida, and Director of the UF Center for Telehealth and Healthcare Communications.  Dr. Mann also serves as Director of the VA Center of Innovation on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (CINDRR) at the North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System, Gainesville, Florida. His research and rehabilitation experience extends internationally to collaborations in Canada, Europe and Brazil and Australia. Dr. Mann has over 35 years of experience in rehabilitation and community-based programs, spanning research, service and education, with a focus on applying technology to promote independence. Dr. Mann's current work addresses the needs of veterans with disabilities, applying home monitoring and communications technologies (telehealth, telerehabilitation) addressing the needs of Veterans with dementia and their caregivers, and tools for driver assessment and rehabilitation.  (Retrieved on July 1, 2015 from http://ot.phhp.ufl.edu/about/people/faculty/william-mann/) Dr. Mann was founder of the journal Technology and Disability and served as co-editor from 1990 to 2000.

 

REFERENCES

Belchior, P, Marsiske, M, Sisco, SM, Yam, A, Bavelier, D, Ball, K & Mann WC.  (2013). Video game training to improve selective visual attention in older adults. Computers in Human Behavior, 29, 1318-1324.

Davenport, RD, Mann, W & Lutz B. (2012). How older adults make decisions regarding smart technology: an ethnographic approach. Assistive Technology, 24, 168-181.

Gitlin, LN, Mann, WC, Vogel. WB & Arthur PB.  (2013 Sep 23). A non-pharmacologic approach to address challenging behaviors of Veterans with dementia: description of the tailored activity program-VA randomized trial. BMC Geriatrics, 2013 Sep 23;13:96. doi: 10.1186/1471-2318-13-96. 

Virgil Mathiowetz, PhD, OTR, FAOTA

2002

Virgil Mathiowetz, PhD, OTR, FAOTA

Dr. Mathiowetz  is Associate Professor and Assistant Director Program in Occupational Therapy, Center for Allied Health Programs, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. (Retrieved on July13, 2015 from http://cahp.umn.edu/websites/cahp/images/faculty-staff/cv-full2012.pdf)  His research interests include fatigue management in chronic conditions, multiple sclerosis, task-oriented approach to CNS dysfunction, stroke, functional outcomes, motor control  and motor learning, assessment of hand strength, dexterity, and hand function (Retrieved on July 13, 2015 from http://cahp.umn.edu/occupational-therapy-faculty)


Q AND A

Identify three words that others have used to describe you.
Persistent, Focused, Committed.

How do you hope to make a difference in the world through research?
I hope to improve the quality of care for the clients that we serve by improving the quality of OT assessments and interventions.

What is one piece of advice you have for individuals considering a career in science and research?
Find a strong mentor.

Beside your own areas of inquiry, what is one research priority that you believe is important for the future of occupational science and occupational therapy?
PCORI emphasis on comparative effectiveness studies.

Describe the most important role that mentors played in your professional journey.  
Mentors have both challenged and supported me in exploring research ideas and methodologies.

Identify a favorite occupation that renews you outside of your work.
I enjoy racquetball as an enjoyable aerobic exercise and an opportunity to be competitive with persons much younger than me!

What has been the most surprising or rewarding aspects of a career in science and research?
The most surprising aspect has been the fact that so many people have cited my early research on the measurement of grip and pinch strength. The most rewarding aspect has been the fact that my research has helped change OT assessments and interventions for the better! I believe that it has improved the quality of care that we provide to our clients. In addition, the opportunity to mentor future researchers and academicians has been very rewarding.


REFERENCES

Mathiowetz, V, Yu CH & Quake-Rapp, C.  (2015 Apr 22). Comparison of a gross anatomy laboratory to online anatomy software for teaching anatomy. Anatomical sciences education, doi: 10.1002/ase.1528. [Epub ahead of print].

Yu CH & Mathiowetz V.  (2014). Systematic review of occupational therapy-related interventions for people with multiple sclerosis: part 1. Activity and participation. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 68, 27-32.  

Yu, CH &  Mathiowetz, V.  (2014). Systematic review of occupational therapy-relatedinterventions for people with multiple sclerosis: part 2. Impairment. The American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 68, 33-38.

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